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KJV

Being Modest Before God

FaithJessica Scheks2 Comments

  As someone who dresses modestly, I love clicking on blog posts and watching YouTube videos of why other women choose to dress modestly. And I absolutely love finding an explanation that I haven't heard before! We tend to hear the same reasons over and over again but recently in church my pastor brought out a new explanation from Genesis that I had never thought of or heard before! In the first few chapters of the entire Bible I think you can find a very solid argument of why it is important to dress modestly before God.

leaves quote

To begin, my pastor was explaining how man always tries to concoct their own ways to try and cover up their sin - it's been happening since Adam and Eve's time. Genesis 3:7 says, "And the eyes of them both were opened, and they knew that they were naked; and they sewed fig leaves together, and made themselves aprons." The key to this scripture is that Adam and Eve made their own coverings; they didn't look to God. It really wouldn't have mattered how covered they were physically because it wasn't God's way.

Adam and Eve were trying to hide their sin from God. They thought they could keep the omniscient, amazing, all-sufficient, eternal God from finding out what they had done. And as a result they were ashamed and felt guilty and tried to hide from Him.

BUT GOD, in His amazing and ever loving kindness sought after them. And in Genesis 3:21, it says:

"Unto Adam also and to his wife did the LORD God make coats of skins, and clothed them."

Those "coats of skins" covered up much more than fig leaves did! Even when we make mistakes, God still wants us to come to Him and He will help us.

God wants us to be modest before Him! I realize that this block of scripture also applies to the spiritual covering that we often are trying to build ourselves as well. But I truly believe that aside from the importance of being spiritually covered, God simply wants us to be physically covered. He didn't think Adam and Eve were covered enough in fig leaves, and people are wearing a lot less than fig leaves these days. I know that people interpret how to dress modestly very differently, but I encourage you to pray and earnestly seek God about how to dress so that you are wearing His "coat of skins" made just for you, and not the world's fig leaves.

 

This is day 5 of the #Write31Days Challenge, to view more challenges click here. For a complete list of my posts in this challenge, click here.

An Endlessly Misinterpreted Scripture

FaithJessica Scheks3 Comments

About a week or so ago I read this post by Lori over at Always Learning. She was talking about contentment and spending less because materials goods have no value -- eternally speaking. She mentioned a verse that I constantly see on Pinterest, that is sometimes posted on Facebook when someone is going through a trial, and is quoted by many in the Christian world. The problem is that people always quote the NIV {this post is not intended to debate which version is the best} instead of the KJV. I've always been taught that the KJV is closer to the original translation and I often use the Strong's KJV concordance while studying to really help me understand a verse better since some of the vocabulary is rarely used anymore or used differently in this day and age.

The verse is Jeremiah 29:11 -- you have probably heard it quoted this way many times:

"'For I know the plans I have for you,' declares the Lord, 'Plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you a hope and a future.'"

However Lori quoted it from the KJV Bible and it takes on an entirely different feeling and meaning:

"For I know the thoughts that I think toward you, saith the Lord, thoughts of peace, and not of evil, to give you an expected end."

{I'm sure I've read this scripture a dozen or so times in the KJV Bible, but it never really struck me until today.}

Now I didn't mean to be super harsh by crossing out the first version of this scripture, but the world tends to interpret this verse very incorrectly when read from this version. They believe that God has a very specific plan for them filled with only good things; they will never be harmed and no matter what they will always have a hope for eternity.

First off -- this scripture is about the Israelites as a whole, it's definitely not directed towards one specific individual, but rather a large nation. People today take it is a promise that God will specifically make sure no harm comes their way as an individual. But by reading more of the Bible we know that trials are going to come our way. Just because we are going through a trial does not mean God has forsaken us! Psalm 34:19 tells us that "Many are the afflictions of the righteous: but the LORD delivereth him out of them ALL!" {Emphasis mine.}

I feel like to continue this post I'm going to have to mention the concept of predestination >> Personally I believe that God predestines certain events, certain jobs for certain people, etc. But I do not believe that He predestines every aspect of every person's life. If He did it seems to me that we would not have free will, or the ability to make choices. My two main "arguments" are that first of all, God has given us the ability to make choices because we have the ability to sin. But if God predestined every single decision we made, then when we did sin would it be God's fault? I think we know the answer. It definitely would not be God's fault. Secondly, if God knew the outcome of everything then praying would be pointless. In Mark 7:25-30, the Syrophoenician Woman changed the mind of God by asking Jesus a second question in order to have the demon driven out of her daughter. If it were predestined that Jesus would not heal her daughter, then her asking a second question and persisting that her daughter be healed wouldn't have changed anything.

Something else that we need to consider is the fall of mankind -- we failed. Therefore we have a curse on this earth which explains much of the evil and sickness that we must endure. If we had not fallen, death would not be a fear of humans because we were not made to die. But mankind decided to sin; it was a decision, and now we have to live with the consequences.

Taking all of this into consideration will tell you that, yes, Christians along with everyone else in the world will go through trials and suffer at some point, but we also have a hope that the rest of the world doesn't have -- That if we continue to walk with God while we're being tested we will come forth as gold! (Job 23:10)

"There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit. For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus hath made me free from the law of sin and death. For what the law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and for sin, condemned sin in the flesh:" // Romans 8:1-3

Jesus made us free! He suffered to make us free. He suffered. He sinlessly suffered to make sinners free. {There is no greater love!} But this means we will also suffer, but we will suffer for Christ's sake! Suffering for Jesus seems like the least I could do since he did everything for me and yet I feel unworthy even to suffer in his name let alone be blessed.

And even though this scripture doesn't mean what so many believers think it means, it doesn't take any of the glory from our God! He does know you personally, after all He created you. He formed you. He is YOUR {personal, loving, all-knowing, amazing, graceful, merciful} GOD!